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разыскивается девушка Юстина-Татьяна Фомина.
буду благодарна любой помощи.

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( 3 comments — Leave a comment )
bystromama
Sep. 21st, 2013 02:12 pm (UTC)
One of its old names, ‘Yelper’, seems inappropriate for so elegant a bird, but is understandable because the bird yelps loudly if an intruder approaches its nest or young.

Feeding: to obtain food avocets stamp their feet on the mud bottom to stir up countless small invertebrates.

It also sometimes nibbles green vegetable matter and very occasionally takes seeds.

Plumage: shining white feathers with a black head and nape and black panels on the wings.

From below the avocet looks all white in flight apart from black wingtips

Nest: a shallow scrape on the open ground (mud or sand or sometimes in short grass) near water, bear, or with a lining of stems, small twigs, dry grass, pebbles or shells.

Eggs: smooth, but non glossy or with slight gloss. Pale brownish buff, very variably marked. Sized from 43.0 x 31.2 mm to 56.3 x 40.8 mm.

Breeds uncommonly, though locally in fairly large loose colonies. Breeding season begins late April in the south to early May in the north.

The mother and father take turns at sitting on the eggs. Although the chicks are able to run and feed themselves within hours of hatching, the parents may continue to care for them.

Max age recorded: 25 years
Annual adult mortality: 22%
Age of first breeding: 2-3years
Clutch size: 4
Body weight: 250-400g

Recurvirostra avocetta
The name is derived from latin recurvo – I curve backwards and rostrum – a beak.


Edited at 2013-09-21 03:00 pm (UTC)
bystromama
Sep. 21st, 2013 03:34 pm (UTC)
One of its old names, ‘Yelper’, seems inappropriate for so elegant a bird, but is understandable because the bird yelps loudly if an intruder approaches its nest or young.

Feeding: to obtain food avocets stamp their feet on the mud bottom to stir up countless small invertebrates.

It also sometimes nibbles green vegetable matter and very occasionally takes seeds.

Plumage: shining white feathers with a black head and nape and black panels on the wings.

From below the avocet looks all white in flight apart from black wingtips

Nest: a shallow scrape on the open ground (mud or sand or sometimes in short grass) near water, bear, or with a lining of stems, small twigs, dry grass, pebbles or shells.

Eggs: smooth, but non glossy or with slight gloss. Pale brownish buff, very variably marked. Sized from 43.0 x 31.2 mm to 56.3 x 40.8 mm.

Breeds uncommonly, though locally in fairly large loose colonies. Breeding season begins late April in the south to early May in the north.

The mother and father take turns at sitting on the eggs. Although the chicks are able to run and feed themselves within hours of hatching, the parents may continue to care for them.

Max age recorded: 25 years
Annual adult mortality: 22%
Age of first breeding: 2-3years
Clutch size: 4
Body weight: 250-400g

Recurvirostra avocetta
The name is derived from latin recurvo – I curve backwards and rostrum – a beak.

Distribution and migration: from muddy coasts in south and east England and most of Europe (Germany, Denmark, Holland and Southern Spain) across Asia to the Far East. Overwinters south of Pakistan and Africa and China, although many individuals do not migrate.

Defending nest and chicks: avocets pretend that their wings are broken and they look like they are easier to kill to lure the predator away from the nest and stopping it eating the chicks.

Food: moluscs and crustaceans are favoured prey, although at inland waters, insects make up much of its diet. Small worms and other invertebrates.

American avocets’ head and neck are rusty in the summer, and grey in the winter.

Sounds: the usual call is a short, rich fluting, which is repeated with great energy, ‘kluit, kluit, kluit’ or ‘kleep’ or ‘kloo-it’ or ‘pleet-pleet’. When young are threatened, parents give a whining and biting shriek ‘grreet’ and perform injury-feighning with unusual intensity.
bystromama
Sep. 21st, 2013 03:48 pm (UTC)
One of its old names, ‘Yelper’, seems inappropriate for so elegant a bird, but is understandable because the bird yelps loudly if an intruder approaches its nest or young.

Feeding: to obtain food avocets stamp their feet on the mud bottom to stir up countless small invertebrates.

It also sometimes nibbles green vegetable matter and very occasionally takes seeds.

Plumage: shining white feathers with a black head and nape and black panels on the wings.

From below the avocet looks all white in flight apart from black wingtips

Nest: a shallow scrape on the open ground (mud or sand or sometimes in short grass) near water, bear, or with a lining of stems, small twigs, dry grass, pebbles or shells.

Eggs: smooth, but non glossy or with slight gloss. Pale brownish buff, very variably marked. Sized from 43.0 x 31.2 mm to 56.3 x 40.8 mm.

Breeds uncommonly, though locally in fairly large loose colonies. Breeding season begins late April in the south to early May in the north.

The mother and father take turns at sitting on the eggs. Although the chicks are able to run and feed themselves within hours of hatching, the parents may continue to care for them.

Max age recorded: 25 years
Annual adult mortality: 22%
Age of first breeding: 2-3years
Clutch size: 4
Body weight: 250-400g

Recurvirostra avocetta
The name is derived from latin recurvo – I curve backwards and rostrum – a beak.

Distribution and migration: from muddy coasts in south and east England and most of Europe (Germany, Denmark, Holland and Southern Spain) across Asia to the Far East. Overwinters south of Pakistan and Africa and China, although many individuals do not migrate.

Defending nest and chicks: avocets pretend that their wings are broken and they look like they are easier to kill to lure the predator away from the nest and stopping it eating the chicks.

Food: moluscs and crustaceans are favoured prey, although at inland waters, insects make up much of its diet. Small worms and other invertebrates.

American avocets’ head and neck are rusty in the summer, and grey in the winter.

Sounds: the usual call is a short, rich fluting, which is repeated with great energy, ‘kluit, kluit, kluit’ or ‘kleep’ or ‘kloo-it’ or ‘pleet-pleet’. When young are threatened, parents give a whining and biting shriek ‘grreet’ and perform injury-feighning with unusual intensity.

Unlike some waders, who don’t like to get their feet wet, avocets wade so deep that they often find themselves swimming.

Avocets were shot for feathers to make fishing flies, and their eggs were stolen for puddings. They were wiped out in Britain by 1825.

Wader, shorebird.

Habitat: shallow sea bays, mudflats, sand banks, estuaries, coastal lagoons and saltwater lakes.

Feeding: avocets sweep their slightly opened bills from side to side under the water surface or up-end lik ducks for crustaceans and worms.
( 3 comments — Leave a comment )

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bystromama
та, у которой времени всегда навалом

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